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Factbox – May’s Brexit ‘plan B’: What happens next in parliament?

LONDON (Reuters) – British Prime Minister Theresa May has sought to break the parliamentary deadlock over Brexit by proposing to seek further concessions from the European Union on a plan to prevent customs checks on the Irish border.

Anti-Brexit campaigner Steve Bray demonstrates outside Downing Street in London, Britain, January 22, 2019. REUTERS/Toby Melville

On Jan. 29, parliament will debate May’s proposed next steps as well as alternative plans put forward by Members of Parliament(MPs), including some that seek to delay Britain’s March 29 exit by requesting an extension to the two-year Article 50 negotiation period.

Some also seek to shift control of the process away from government and give parliament the chance to define Brexit. If successful, this could have a profound effect, giving MPs who want to block, delay or renegotiate Brexit a possible legal route to do so.

Below is what is due to happen next:

JAN. 21-29: MPS PROPOSE ALTERNATIVES

MPs have begun proposing alternatives to May’s next steps through a parliamentary device known as an amendment. Amendments will be selected on Jan. 29 by speaker John Bercow and can then be put to a vote.

Below are the amendments that have been put forward so far:

AMENDMENT A

Proposed by opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn, it calls for parliament to consider alternative options to prevent Britain leaving without a deal, including seeking a permanent customs union with the EU and holding a second referendum.

This is unlikely to be approved as pro-EU Conservative MPs have indicated that they will not support it.

AMENDMENT B

Put forward by a group of Labour MPs, this calls on the government to request an extension to the Article 50 deadline so that a ‘Citizen’s Assembly’ of 250 people can be created to consider the way forward and make recommendations to parliament within 10 weeks of being set up.

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